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Nonverbal
Communication

My dissertation research was primarily concerned with human nonverbal behavior, and although I have drifted into other areas over the years, I have maintained an active interest in nonverbal communication. I occasionally review manuscripts for The Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, and I have done a number of studies on gaze behavior, facial expression, gestures, and the system of nonverbal behaviors involved with maintaining intimacy levels in interactions. These behaviors are called nonverbal "immediacy" behaviors and they include such things as interpersonal distance, eye contact, smiling, and touching.

 

A list of some of my nonverbal behavior research projects follows.

Publications & Presentations:

McAndrew, F. T. (2022 September 2). Demystifying the power and meaning of eye contact In Out of the Ooze: Navigating the 21st Century with a Stone-Age Mind, Psychology Today Magazine.

McAndrew, F. T. (2019, October 28). Why we love big, blood-curdling screams. Appears in dozens of media outlets, including The Conversation, Time Magazine, Discover Magazine, The Big Think, LiveScience, & Medical Xpress.

McAndrew, F. T. (2019, January 29). "Quasi-Courtship" Behaviors Can Energize a Workplace. In Out of the Ooze: Navigating the 21st Century with a Stone-Age Mind, Psychology Today Magazine.

McAndrew, F. T. (2019, January 27). Reading Faces: Why You Sometimes get It Wrong. In Out of the Ooze: Navigating the 21st Century with a Stone-Age Mind, Psychology Today Magazine.

McAndrew, F. T. (2017, July 18). What is the right size for a group conversation? In Out of the Ooze: Navigating the 21st Century with a Stone-Age Mind, Psychology Today Magazine.

McAndrew, F. T., & Koehnke, S. S. (2016). On the Nature of CreepinessNew Ideas in Psychology, 43, 10-15.

McAndrew, F. T. (2015, May). How We Decide Who's Creepy.  In Out of the Ooze: Navigating the 21st Century with a Stone-Age Mind. Psychology Today Magazine.

McAndrew, F. T., & Koehnke, S. S. (2013, January).  Creepiness.  Poster presentation at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), New Orleans, LA.

(Also presented as a poster at the Annual Meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society June, 2015 - Columbia, MO)

McAndrew, F.T.(1989, November). Why apes have eyebrows: Evolution and human nonverbal communication. Invited colloqium presented at the University of Scranton, Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Hoots, M.A., McAndrew, F.T., & Francois, G.R.(1989). Decoding of gestures in kindergarten, first, and third grade children. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 150, 117-118.

McAndrew, F.T.(1987). Decoding visual dominance among Pakistani college students. Journal of Social Psychology, 127, 317-320.

McAndrew, F.T.(1986, April). Decoding visual dominance and Pakistani college students: A failure at cross-cultural replication. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York.

McAndrew, F.T., and Warner, J.E.(1986). Arousal seeking and the maintenance of mutual gaze in same and mixed-sex dyads. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 10, 168-172.

McAndrew, F.T.(1986). A cross-cultural study of recognition thresholds for facial expressions of emotion. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 17, 211-224.

McAndrew, F.T.(1985, April). Recognition thresholds for facial expressions of emotion in American and Malaysian college students. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston.

McAndrew, F.T., Gold, J.A., Lenney, E., & Ryckman, R.M.(1984). Explorations in immediacy: The nonverbal system and its relationship to affective and situational factors. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 8, 210-228.

McAndrew, F.T.(1981). Interpersonal attraction, arousal, and nonverbal immediacy behaviors. Doctoral dissertation, University of Maine. Abstract appears in Dissertation Abstracts International, 1982, 42, February, 3499-3500b.

McAndrew, F.T.(1980, April). Interpersonal attraction, arousal, and nonverbal immediacy behaviors: A correlational analysis. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Hartford.

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